The Turkey And Thanksgiving

Upon its discovery by Europeans, the turkey became almost immediately popular. William Bradford recorded that wild turkey was on the table at the first thanksgiving.  Turkeys also were almost immediately taken back to Europe, domesticated, and developed into different breeds. The turkey was much prized in Colonial America. Benjamin Franklin actually proposed that the turkey be used as the national symbol instead of an Eagle. Franklin wrote in a letter to his daughter:

“For my own part I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He does not get his Living honestly. You may have seen him perched on some dead Tree near the River, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the Labour of the Fishing Hawk; and when that diligent Bird has at length taken a Fish, and is bearing it to his Nest for the Support of his Mate and young Ones, the Bald Eagle pursues him and takes it from him.

“With all this Injustice, he is never in good Case but like those among Men who live by Sharping & Robbing he is generally poor and often very lousy. Besides he is a rank Coward: The little King Bird not bigger than a Sparrow attacks him boldly and drives him out of the District. He is therefore by no means a proper Emblem for the brave and honest Cincinnati of America who have driven all the King birds from our Country . . .

“I am on this account not displeased that the Figure is not known as a Bald Eagle, but looks more like a Turkey. For the Truth the Turkey is in Comparison a much more respectable Bird, and withal a true original Native of America . . . He is besides, though a little vain & silly, a Bird of Courage, and would not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on.”

The modern domestic turkey has been developed for its large breast, white meat and fast growth.According the the US Department of Agriculture, nearly 3 billion pounds of turkey are processed each year. More than 40 million turkeys are eaten at Thanksgiving each year.

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